3 Steps for Preparing for the Unexpected

When working with cyclists you are thrown a lot of curve balls. Racing is unpredictable and so are people. Regardless of how much you prepare, things can, and do, happen that are out of the ordinary. During our recent summer race season we had our fair share of crashes, illness and injuries. One of our riders had her bike stolen two days before a race. But the show must go on. While a lot of the time things looks cool calm and collected from the outside, there is a flurry of activity taking place to get things back on track.

The same is true in a corporate environment. It is here that we also see a lot of unexpected events: timelines move forward (or back), meetings run long, equipment fails, people get stuck in traffic jams. Unlike running a cycling team, where we expect the unexpected, these events seem to have a larger impact. They come as more of a surprise.

So what are the things you can do to prepare for the unexpected? Here are three lessons learned from managing people in the sporting field, which are just as relevant to managing people in any other workplace.

1. Talk it out

As we discussed in our last article, the guiding principle of the #RoxsoltLadies race team is have fun and communicate.

The communicate part isn’t just about social chit chat. We structure a lot of our communication to identify potential issues, conflicts or events. This enables us to have a workaround that has already been discussed.

When hit with a stressful surprise, thinking isn’t always as clear as we’d like it to be. Because we have talked through possible responses in the past, this makes a response under pressure much calmer, and more familiar.

The #RoxsoltLadies will have a number of discussions about an upcoming race as they develop a cohesive plan for the day. Initially, these are one-on-one conversations between staff and staff, between riders and staff, and riders and riders.

We also have two team meetings involving all staff and riders to make sure everyone is on the same page. The first is a longer more comprehensive meeting the evening before the race. The second is a quicker discussion, reiterating key points and solving any last minute issues. This one takes place about an hour before the racing begins.

We look at various scenarios that may surface, such as delays and crashes. We discuss the roles and responsibilities of each team member during those events, and a plan of action if one of these scenarios takes place.

This translates well to the corporate environment. By discussing unexpected events, activities and outcomes, teams can make plans and make these situations feel familiar rather than stressful or strange.

It’s important to note that just because you are discussing what could happen, this does not mean you think it will happen. You are simply helping everyone understand what actions, outcomes and responsibilities may be implemented – just in case.

2. Call ahead

Once you have started to think through some of the different scenarios that may eventuate, and what some potential reactions may be, the next step is to be proactive in the response. Don’t wait until you have an unexpected event to reach out to those who you may require assistance from.

For the #RoxsoltLadies, the most disruptive events are mechanical issues with the bikes, or health issues for the riders. When traveling for multi-day races we plan ahead by identifying, and making contact with, those who may be able to help; a bike shop or manufacturer, doctors and physios.

As we race a lot during the summer holiday period, this impacts who is and isn’t available to help. By finding out these things in advance, it reduces the time spent seeking this information when we need it the most. We do the same for simple items as well. Knowing the opening hours of shops and petrol station locations, for example, allows us to keep our focus on the task at hand.

In the corporate environment it's important to consider who – within an organisation and outside of it – is the best to assist with the unexpected diversions or delays. Don’t wait until you have an critical event to introduce yourself and find out how to engage with these resources.

Consider what the most high impact events may be, think about who can best help, and reach out early. If you need to call on them in a panic, you’ll both be glad of the benefits that come from making contact in advance.

3. Make it routine

There is a tendency to ignore the unexpected in business. We don’t like the things that are out of our control and we prefer to focus on good news than bad. This behaviour can magnify the negative outcomes of an adverse event and can limit an effective response. Encourage a glass half empty mindset within the team during the planning phase to call out potentially disruptive events.

With the #RoxsoltLadies we have a strong routine. Key information, such as critical contact details, are written down. Standard operating procedures are written up and shared. We even share a packing list with riders and staff prior to travel. This allows us to make sure that everyone knows what to bring and what is being provided.

Run sheets are provided in advance to act as a guide of what to expect and we communicate key expectations for each race. Even though we are working with professional athletes, we provide a media briefing to everyone for each race. Once again, this ensures that we are on the same page.

As discussed above, staff conduct a briefing on who is doing what before the beginning of each race. If there is a crash, what do we do? A mechanical, what happens next? We carry items that are commonly broken  with us, we take spare clothing, helmets, shoes, wheels…for some races we bring a spare bike.

The key thing to remember is that the more you work through the unexpected, the more routine these actions become. Problem solving becomes normal, response times are shortened, focus is maintained.

For the corporate environment, it’s important to ensure that response plans are discussed frequently. There is little point taking the time to discuss the unexpected if you store it on the shelf for 12 months, forget about it, and get caught unprepared and off-guard.

Look to integrate discussion about potential events, disruptions and conflicts in team meetings. Ensure that responses remain suitable and build in group cohesion and routine. Encourage team members to call out areas that may have gaps and, most importantly, conduct a review of events to identify changes that can be made for future.

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Talk it out, call ahead and make it routine. It’s when we expect the unexpected, that people really start to excel as a team.

 

5 Key Attributes for Forming Dynamic and Successful Teams

The success story behind the #RoxsoltLadies cycling program.

“We don’t want a team of champions, we want a champion team” – Sarah Roy, 2014 Australian National Criterium Champion.

Many organisations look to self-forming, collaborative teams for success; teams that are formed for a specific purpose, working together in a dynamic and agile way. In these situations traditional hierarchical control structures are discarded, and a self-managed model for performance is favoured. But even in this environment, a structured approach to collaboration and teamwork is a key foundation for success.

In the space of two summer race seasons, Roxsolt developed one of Australia’s highest performing women’s cycling teams. This team was made up of athletes that typically compete against each other throughout the other months of the year. Success was achieved by taking carefully considered steps toward a common goal.

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Team members at the Santos Women's Tour Down Under (L:R - Lauren Kitchen - Hitec Products, Loren Rowney - Velocio-SRAM, Carlee Taylor - Lotto Soudal, Tiffany Crownwell - Velocio-SRAM & Lucy Martin - Matrix Fitness). Photo credit: Kirsty Baxter

Over the 2014-2015 summer race season, the #RoxsoltLadies roster included 12 riders, working in different combinations and capacities, over seven high-profile events. We achieved with three wins, nine additional podiums, and finished the season ranked as the number one women’s cycling team in Australia.

Teamwork not only allowed the #RoxsoltLadies to flourish, but they did so while drawing on minimal staff and resources, and maintaining a relaxed working environment. We built a team capable of winning against some of the best in the world.

So how did we work with such a varied roster to produce such a stable suite of results? Our methods reveal the five key attributes of any dynamic and successful team.

1. Establish a Common Purpose

Success flows from working toward a common purpose. For the #RoxsoltLadies the emphasis for the race season was not about winning or individual performance. We knew that if we focused on clear communication and having fun, a smoother, more enjoyable working method would lead to a stronger, more cohesive output.

While many cycling teams draw funding from multiple sources, the #RoxsoltLadies team drew from a single source. This meant the team did not have to worry about meeting conflicting requirements or feeling pressured to satisfy multiple purposes. This removed potential distractions and enabled the team to focus on the process rather than the outcomes.

“We always had fun and I think because we were friends off the bike it made working together on the bike easy. We all knew each other’s strengths and complemented each other well. It was a unique team as we all race on different professional teams usually yet, our experience as cyclists meant we knew how each other rode and how each member could contribute…” - Carlee Taylor, Australian World Championships representative 2013 and 2014.

2. Make Team Composition Personal and Be Involved

“…I think it is because when everyone comes together as part of the 'Roxsolt' team everyone wants to help, do their job and do their best, just as Roxsolt do supporting this team. So it is a case of giving back to Roxsolt and making sure each race is a success.”- Lucy Martin, British Olympian & World Championship representative.

The #RoxsoltLadies roster was established through recommendations from past team members as a first point of introduction. Working toward a common goal enabled us to build a group that drew on professionals with different skillsets and expertise. Forming the team around an ethos of collaboration and recommendation meant members were already invested in our committed, strategic approach prior to coming on board.

“For a team that was merged at the last minute, Roxsolt has done exceptionally well. To do well in a cycling team involves absolute commitment and an attitude of 'all for one'. I think that we achieved a lot of team goals this summer by winning certain races and getting jerseys in events.” - Kimberley Wells, Australian National Criterium Champion 2013 & 2015.

3. Think Ahead and Anticipate Needs

Maximising performance requires a manager to anticipate needs, solve problems and adapt ahead of time. Don’t distract the team by making them perform tasks that could be better performed by others. Likewise, when the team requires outside expertise, this needs to be accessed quickly.

Over the 2014-2015 summer race season, riders became sick or injured, one had her bike stolen and everyone had to deal with last minute changes to schedules and programs. When possible, removing external noise away from the team enabled the #RoxsoltLadies to focus on the task at hand, bringing emphasis back to process. To maximise team value, a team must be supported, rather than left alone to solve problems by themselves.

#RoxsoltLadies is the first team I can truly say I was privileged to be a part of.  The teamwork and dedication that went into achieving our goals over the summer was inspiring to be a part of and my cycling definitely lifted to another level.  The staff were so organised and professional, it made achieving success so much easier!” - Joanne Hogan, overall winner Australian National Road Series 2010.

4. A Team is Made Up of Many Individuals

Individuals are typically selected for a team due to their unique value, attributes and the contribution they can bring. To maximise this contribution team members must be nurtured individually to facilitate their unique strengths and requirements. This may be as simple supplying food or drink that helps someone to get the job done, or as complicated as determining when an individual can best participate in the steps toward a team objective or event.

By cultivating an environment that ensures every team member’s requirements are met, this ensures that each member’s attributes can be integrated into the team effectively. Investment is maximised and conditions are created for increased success.

“The reason I believe the team was so successful, even with such a dynamic roster of riders and race programs, was the pride each member has to be a part of the team. A team that began as ‘the rest’ soon became one of Australian racing’s most recognised criterium teams, a clear force to the other major players of Orica-AIS and Wiggle Honda. Roxsolt gave the team so much of their time and energy meeting all our individual needs, how could we not perform well?!” - Lauren Kitchen, Australian Criterium Champion 2011, Oceania Road Race Champion 2015, Australian World Championships Representative.

5. Everyone has a Role to Play

“What Roxsolt have been able to do this summer has been amazing. The team composition I feel really worked, with riders from different pro teams bringing their own experience, values and tactics to the outfit.” -Loren Rowney, Australian World Championship Representative 2012 and 2014.

When bringing a team together for a specific, deadline-driven purpose, there is not always time available for developing a strong sense of cohesion. From the outset it is important that every member has a role to play. This role needs to be specific, clearly articulated and understood.

For each race the #RoxsoltLadies competed in there was always a captain and co-captain who were trusted with in-race decision-making. All team members were responsible for adapting and adjusting to in-race decisions and to perform a job if they were asked.

The role of the support staff and support teams that operate around a dynamic team is equally important. Roles, responsibilities and decision-making hierarchies must be clearly understood. Key to this is an understanding of when a certain number of voices can be too many, and restricting the team size to a workable structure as a result.

The summer racing season demonstrated that, for the #RoxsoltLadies, eight people was the maximum working size of a functional and successful team. Beyond this the team would lose focus and an ability to quickly respond. This meant that an effective team for a given race consisted of six riders and two support staff, who provided assistance and direction. It was when the roles and responsibilities were clearly understood that the team functioned at its best.

We don't want a team of champions, we want a champion team - which so far has been a bunch of supportive riders and management who all understand the complications summer can bring to form and with no pressure to perform per se …. by giving everything they have for a team result. It's really the ideal team! “ - Sarah Roy, 2014 Australian Criterium Champion.

Roxsolt Racing Team Round Out Summer Racing Season With Cadel Evans Great Ocean Road Race

After a successful summer racing series the Roxsolt Racing team are looking to close their racing account on a high at the inaugural Cadel Evans Great Ocean Road race this weekend.  With three major wins and multiple podium finishes throughout the summer racing series, Roxsolt Racing has been one of the most successful teams of the season. It’s a trend they hope to continue in Geelong this weekend at the Cadel Evans Great Ocean Road race.

Inspired by the prestigious Spring Classics of Europe the race promises high drama and fierce competition for the elite women who will compete on Saturday before the elite men’s race on Sunday.

Tiffany Cromwell in action at the Mitchelton Bay Cycling Classic. Photo Credit: Kirsty Baxter
Tiffany Cromwell in action at the Mitchelton Bay Cycling Classic. Photo Credit: Kirsty Baxter

The 113km course starts and finishes in Geelong and takes in part of the 2010 UCI World Road Championship course.

Roxsolt team manager Kelvin Rundle is looking forward to the event believing the Classic style race will offer a great opportunity to show case women’s cycling.

“I’m busting with excitement. If you look at our squad every rider except Joanne Hogan has raced at the World Championships. This is as close as I will ever get to directing a World Championship team!” Kelvin laughed.

“It’s going to be a great event,” he said.

The Roxsolt team includes 2014 Australian World Championship representatives Tiffany Cromwell, Loren Rowney and Carlee Taylor as well as British Olympian Lucy Martin and European professional Joanne Hogan.

Kelvin said the event will be a phenomenal way to end the team's second season.

“As a team, we’ve really fulfilled our objective which was to add another dimension to the women’s summer racing in Australia,” Kelvin said.

“I’ve been really happy with the summer, I do really think that having a third really strong team alongside the squads of Orica-AIS and Wiggle Down Under has created some really great, aggressive and dynamic racing,” he finished.

The signature Roxsolt racing jersey designed by rider Tiffany Cromwell can be bought for a limited time at the roxcycl.cc website.

Roxsolt Ladies Claim Sprint And Mountain Jerseys In Opening Stage Of Santos Women’s Cup

After an already successful summer racing campaign which includes major victories at the Stan Siejka Cycling Classic and the Shimano Super Criterium the Roxsolt Racing team has again left an impact on the women’s racing scene. Lauren Kitchen earned the Santos Women’s Cup sprinter’s and mountain's  in the 59km opening road stage from Woodside to Murray Bridge in the Adelaide Hills.  [embed]https://twitter.com/LaurenKitchen1/status/556321870350282752[/embed]

Continuing on from her impressive performances at the Mitchelton Bay Cycling Classic and National Championships Lauren Kitchen sprinted to second on the first stage of the Tour and has a narrow lead in the race's sprint competition after picking up precious points in the only intermediate sprint of the day.

After an aggressive day of racing that saw Roxsolt Ladies rider Loren Rowney take out the mountain sprint of the day and the field shattered in cross winds Kitchen outsmarted some of the best sprinters in Australia to take out the bunch kick for the minor placings after Orica-AIS’ Italian recruit Valentina Scandolara took an impressive solo victory.

The stage was raced exceptionally fast with the peloton finishing minutes ahead of the predicted schedule.

The Roxsolt Ladies team, which is in it’s second summer racing season, had a clear goal leading into the four day tour.

“Our plan going into the race was to be aggressive and highlight women’s racing on the world stage at the Tour Down Under,” Lauren said.

“Finishing second was great, I didn’t know if I would have the legs to mix it with the sprinters so I was happy to win the bunch kick,” Lauren continued.

The team isn’t putting any pressures on themselves for the rest of the Tour, however.

“We want to have fun racing at the Tour Down Under,” Lauren said.

“We are looking for an exciting race and look forward to the next few stages!” she said.

The Tour continues tomorrow with a 40 minute criterium in East Adelaide.

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Roxsolt debuts in NRS with star-studded line up

Roxsolt Ladies make their National Road Series (NRS) debut at the Santos Women’s Tour Down Under from the 17th to the 20th of January. The Roxsolt Ladies team experienced a very successful summer criterium campaign notching up two wins and a string of podiums over the past two months. The team will be looking to transfer this success into their first NRS outing as Roxsolt Ladies.

The team bring a very experienced line up of riders who will be hungry for both stage victories as well as challenging for the general classification leaders jersey.

Loren Rowney at the recent Mitchelton Bay Cycling Classic. Photo credit: Kirsty Baxter.
Loren Rowney at the recent Mitchelton Bay Cycling Classic. Photo credit: Kirsty Baxter.

Australia’s highest ranked female cyclist, Tiffany Cromwell leads the team for her home tour supported by her Velocio- Sram trade teammate Loren Rowney. Lotto-Soudal’s Carlee Taylor adds climbing power to the line up and will be a favourite for the road stages. Mitchelton Bay Classic Green Jersey winner Lauren Kitchen will be looking to lead the team in the sprints with London Olympian Lucy Martin rounding out the squad.

Carlee will be looking to make a mark on the road stages as she hunts a result in her home tour.

“Checker’s hill will be a tough climb, I think it will do a lot of damage and hopefully with an aggressive race, a stage I can do well in," Carlee said.

The main focus for Roxsolt Ladies is to have a fun week of racing while being at the pointy end of the action.

Kitchen believes the main competition will come from professional European teams Orica-AIS and Wiggle Down Under along with new NRS team High 5 Dream Team.

“I think we will be looking for an aggressive race and looking to leave it all out there on the road, it will be tough with the like’s of Orica, Wiggle and High 5 but I think we will be up there," Kitchen explained

“But the main focus is to enjoy the tour and to show of our Roxsolt Jerseys," she said.

Roxsolt Ladies is lead by Director and Manger Kelvin Rundle

Santos Women’s Tour Roster: Tiffany Cromwell, Lauren Kitchen, Lucy Martin, Loren Rowney and Carlee Taylor.

Lauren Kitchen Wins Sprint Jersey At 2015 Mitchelton Bay Cycling Classic And Finishes Second Overall

Roxsolt Racing’s Lauren Kitchen wrapped up a successful week of racing in the fourth and final stage of the Bay Cycling Classic in Williamstown, Victoria yesterday as teammate Kimberley Wells sprinted to second on the stage to claim Roxsolt’s third podium of the week. Kitchen went into the stage with an unbeatable lead in the race’s sprint competition after consistent racing throughout the four race series.

[embed]https://twitter.com/RochelleGilmore/status/552087415146295296[/embed]

With the green jersey safely in the back pocket of the Roxsolt team they turned their attention to claiming yellow after Lauren’s strong finish on Sunday’s third stage in Portarlington saw her move to within two points of the race lead.

Despite a well fought battle in yesterday’s fourth stage however, the team had to settle for second overall behind eventual race winner Chloe Hosking (Wiggle Down Under) who lead the series from start to finish.

[embed]https://twitter.com/cyclingvictoria/status/551970297084010497[/embed]

Lauren was all praise for her Roxsolt teammates who rode in support of her throughout the week.

“The last two days we really rode well as a team,” Lauren said.

“We came together at the start of the week having not raced together and I think that’s a big compliment to Kelvin (Rundle, team owner and manager) that he can bring women together who haven’t ridden with each other and probably wont ride all together again and create this cohesive team,” she said.

“We’re happy as a team. We came into the race with the clear objective of winning the sprint jersey and we achieved that,” Lauren continued.

However, Lauren’s second overall finish was a pleasant surprise. After having major surgery on her left leg in October Lauren had to have eight weeks off the bike and has only been back training for five weeks.

“My form was really unknown coming into this week,” she said.

“I knew I had been training hard but I hadn’t done any intensity so to be able to back up everyday and be at the pointy end of the bike race I’m very happy,” Lauren finished.

The Roxsolt Racing team will line up again later this month at the Santos Women’s Tour in Adelaide and finished their summer racing campaign at the Cadel Evans Road Race.

[embed]https://twitter.com/LaurenKitchen1/status/551974555250483200[/embed]

Kitchen Cements Sprint Jersey And Moves In On Yellow

Roxsolt Racing’s Lauren Kitchen continued her strong performance at the Mitchelton Bay Cycling Classic today finishing third on the tough Port Arlington circuit, securing her lead in the sprint classification and moving within two points of the overall series lead.  After finishing second on the opening stage of the series on Friday and fifth in yesterday’s second stage Lauren started the penultimate stage of the series in the green sprint jersey and in third position overall behind race leader Chloe Hosking (Wiggle Down Under) and Gracie Elvin (Orica-AIS).

[embed]https://twitter.com/LaurenKitchen1/status/551620859945697280[/embed]

The race was fast paced from the beginning with the peloton splintering as the riders tackled a challenging climb each lap. While a number of riders tried to sneak of the front of the peloton it wasn’t until Peta Mullens launched a brave solo breakaway after the first intermediate sprint of the day that anything escaped.

Mullens extended her lead to more than 20 seconds on the chasing peloton and finished comfortably ahead of Giorgia Bronzini (Wiggle Down Under) and Lauren on the stage.

By the end of the day Lauren had earned herself an unassailable lead in the sprinters competition leading into tomorrow’s final stage in Williamstown and had moved within striking distance of race leader Chloe Hosking who now holds yellow by a slim margin.

“We’re really happy to have retained the green jersey and have locked that up for Roxsolt as that was a big goal for us at the start of the week,” an ecstatic Lauren said after the stage.

“It was great to get on the podium again for Roxsolt but of course we’ll be hoping to build on that tomorrow,” Lauren said alluding to the team’s intentions to make a serious play for the yellow jersey tomorrow.

“I definitely couldn’t have done this without the support of my team,” Lauren continued.

“A big thanks has to go to Kelvin for putting the team together and giving me the opportunity,” she finished.

[embed]https://twitter.com/Bartoli84/status/551626616565411840[/embed]

Kitchen Sprints Into Green Jersey at Mitchelton Bay Cycling Classic

Lauren Kitchen got the Roxsolt Racing team off to a fantastic start at the Mitchelton Bay Cycling Classic in Geelong today after she secured the green sprinters jersey and finished second on the stage behind race winner Chloe Hosking (Wiggle Down Under).  Lauren finished fourth in the first intermediate sprint of the day and first in the second and final intermediate sprint to secure her lead in the sprint classification ahead of tomorrow’s Eastern Park stage two.

Lauren, who is on the comeback from injury after having undergone major surgery on her left leg in October, said she was really happy with how the Roxsolt team performed and her personal performance as well.

[embed]https://twitter.com/MarkGunterPhoto/status/550949607237115905[/embed]

“I felt really good, it was a good hit out and I’m really looking forward to the rest of the week with Roxsolt,” Lauren said after the stage.

Kitchen was part of a five rider break which escaped with a little more than 20 minutes to go on the Ritchie Boulevard hotdog circuit raced in downtown Geelong this afternoon. The break worked well to establish a sizable gap over the chasing peloton until the closing laps of the 45 minute event when tactics started to come into play.

“I was really aware that if it was going to come back together we could line up Kimbers (Kimberley Wells) for the sprint so I was trying to rest and recover in the break away knowing that we had Kimberley behind,” Lauren said.

“We were really keen to just go out and have a hard race given the race was being shown on national TV. Our goal was to have a podium and also to take the sprint jersey so we’re happy to have achieved both those goals,” she said.

[embed]https://twitter.com/Roxcycl/status/550940916123308033[/embed]

Team owner and director Kelvin Rundle was all smiles after the stage. 2015 is the second year he has entered a team in the Mitchelton Bay Cycling Classic and he’s attracted some of the best Australian riders in the peloton to his squad including 2014 Australian Female Road Cycling of the Year, Tiffany Cromwell and and 2013 National Criterium Champion, Kimberley Wells.

“We’re just looking to have some fun and to show some great racing. Today the team road a fantastic race. Jo Hogan and Carlee Taylor did some massive work on the front and Jo was actually solo for a quarter of the race. It was exciting racing,” Kelvin said.

[embed]https://twitter.com/healthycyclist/status/550942680893493248[/embed]

Guest Blog- Lauren Kitchen preview's Bay Crits

Bay Crits 2015 Preview by Lauren Kitchen It’s the new year and that means one thing, time to head down to Geelong to get stuck into some fast and furious criterium action at the Bay Crits. This will be my eighth Bay Crits having competed every year except one since I was U19. I love starting the new year and the new season here and this year Im just as excited as if I was that 16 year old kid again.

SKCC Supercrit 2014 no wm-279

In 2015 I will be racing with the Roxsolt team for the second year. We have a super strong team this year with; Kimberley, Loren, Tiff, Carlee, Jo and myself and we are being led by our owner manager Kelvin Rundle. So whats going to happen this week? Well here is my prediction;

Having a slightly changed format with teams now allowed to start 6 riders instead of 5 this will for sure change the dynamic of the racing with teams having more cards to play on different courses. Teams are now also able to pick and choose which days they race different riders, this will give some teams an advantage with rested riders coming in later in the series, while I believe most riders will race all four criteriums, there are a large number of individuals just targeting one or two days, most likely to perfect their nationals preparation.

Day 1 is Ritchie Boulevard, an infamous heart-pumping hot dog course at only 600m long, it results in about 100 standing starts in 45 minutes. What is great about this course is it is not only a great spectacle, it can be a great tactical race that has been won from nearly every situation. Roxsolt will have a few cards to play here as we expect to be one of the most inform teams, but if it comes to a sprint we will be looking to set up Kimbers against the likes of the Hosking-Bronzini duo of Wiggle Downunder. Giorgia won here last year with Kimbers taking it in 2013 and Hosking in 2012.

Logo- Roxsolt

Day 2 we move to the Botanic Gardens where we are faced with a more open course where the wind is defiantly a big factor. This course has a touch little climb just before a long finish straight so in the past has lead itself to a tough long sprint with Hosking (then of Roxsolt) taking the win here last year. This is an important day for us as we will also be celebrating Kelvin’s 40th Birthday! We will be racing to get Roxsolt out there on day two and we hope you see one of us with our arms in the air at the end of the day.

Day 3 is Portarlington. I have a love hate relationship with this course. You can’t hide here. This is the race where it shows your form. Back in 2007 Gary Sutton told me, “this course will suit you” so as a 16 year old I toughed it out and I finished. I was the only rider from my team that year to do so and it was my biggest achievement of the week. Since then the course has changed slightly a few times but we have always seen a tough race. Tif has won here twice and last year Jo was 4th on this circuit. I have had my best results here with a 1st (2008) and a 2nd (2011). This course will suit our team. You can look for us at the front trying to force the break in Portarlington.

Day 4: Last day is Williamstown. The is a great spot to finish, with a trendy Melbourne vibe and cute cafes lining the course, by day 4 a coffee fuel up is a must. Being a dead flat square course we normally see a bunch sprint, however its day four, so anything can happen. Roxsolt will want to go out with a bang and we are aware we have one of the fastest girls with us so I think Williamstown might be about Kimbers lining it up.

There are two other super strong stacked teams for 2015 with Wiggle Downunder and Orica AIS. So Im sure it will be really exciting racing. Our main goal is to have fun, but we are a competitive bunch of girls so hopefully you will see us on the podium.

Now to catch a plane

Lauren

Roxsolt Racing Team Recruit International Stars for Mitchelton Bay Cycling Classic

Tiffany Cromwell, Loren Rowney and Carlee Taylor join Sydney based Roxsolt Racing team for the 25th edition of the Mitchelton Bay Cycling Classic in Geelong, Victoria. After a successful start to the team’s summer racing schedule which included victories at the Stan Siejka Launceston Cycling Classic and the Shimano Super Criterium Roxsolt will make it’s second appearance at the four day criterium series raced in and around Geelong from the 2-5 of January.

A revamped roster which includes 2014 Australian Elite Female Road Cyclist of the year Tiffany Cromwell and her Velocio-SRAM teammate Loren Rowney, 2013 National Criterium Champion Kimberley Wells and European professionals Lauren Kitchen (Hitec Products), Carlee Taylor (Lotto-Soudal), and Joanne Hogan, the squad will be looking to emulate their success from 2014 which included a stage victory in Eastern Park.

"...we’ve gained riders like Tiff Cromwell and Loren Rowney who are two of the best female Australian riders racing internationally at the moment" - Team owner, Kelvin Rundle.

Team director and owner Kelvin Rundle is quietly confident about what team can achieve this coming week in Geelong.

“We’re very excited about the team we’ve put together for this year’s edition of the Mitchelton Bay Cycling Classic,” Kelvin said.

“While we had to say goodbye to Sarah Roy and Chloe Hosking who both will join their European trade teams for 2015 we’ve gained riders like Tiff Cromwell and Loren Rowney who are two of the best female Australian riders racing internationally at the moment,” he said.

Established in 2013 the Roxsolt racing team aims at providing a well organised and supportive environment for top Australian female cyclists during the Australian summer while also placing an emphasis on supporting the development of up and coming domestic and international talent.

“The team is about seizing opportunities missed by others. Many of our riders race for European teams but have little support when they come back to Australia. We give them the support they need to race throughout the Australian summer,” Kelvin said.

“It’s an idea inline with the business values of Roxsolt. We think the formula is working pretty well,” he said.

"It’s always nice to have an Aussie team to race with when I’m home” - Tiffany Cromwell.

Having a supportive and professional environment to race in was what attracted Tiffany Cromwell to the Australian summer squad.

“Kelvin emailed me and asked if I would be interested in racing with the team and it just seemed like a good fit. It’s always nice to have an Aussie team to race with when I’m home,” Tiffany said.

While Tiffany has won in Geelong before she’s not lumping all the pressure on herself, however.

“We have a really strong team with Kimberley Wells and the other girls. Of course I’m always looking for victories but I’m also looking to use the races as a way of finding my race legs for nationals,” she said.

Along with her teammates Tiffany will debut the new Roxsolt Racing colours on Friday at the infamous Ritchie Boulevard hotdog circuit in downtown Geelong. It’s a jersey she designed herself and it will be the first time she’s raced in her own Tiffany Jane design.

“Kelvin asked me to design the summer jersey and I was more than happy to. It was fun to come up with actually. I’m looking forward to racing in it,” she said.

The series will wrap up on Monday, January 5 in Williamstown.

Roxsolt Team for Mitchelton Bay Cycling Classic: Tiffany Cromwell, Joanne Hogan, Lauren Kitchen, Loren Rowney, Carlee Taylor, Kimberley Wells.

Guest Blog: Sarah Roy talks Shimano Super Crit, spilling gels, and trusting teammates.

If people didn’t know what Roxsolt (both the company and the cycling team) were about, they should by now! We just won another Aussie summer criterium in Melbourne at the Shimano St Kilda Super Crit. The riders; Lauren Kitchen, Chloe Hosking, Kimberley Wells, Jo Hogan and me, Sarah Roy, displayed unwavering confidence going into the event despite the forgoing pressure from riders and media suggesting we were the team to beat.

"It’s amazing how easy it feels for a trust worthy bunch of cyclists to achieve success."

Being the professionals and friends that we are, we left our individualised cycling lives behind and joined forces for the day as if we’d trained and raced together all season. It’s amazing how easy it feels for a trust worthy bunch of cyclists to achieve success.

[embed]http://instagram.com/p/wk-QNer7BB/[/embed]

I’m not going to lie, The Shimano Super Crit is one of the best paying, equal prize events in Australia, if not THE best, and Roxsolt’s aim was to fill our empty female cyclists’ pockets with some quality cash while displaying classy and exciting bike racing.

We wanted the win! And we also wanted two Roxsolt jersey’s on the podium. I think Kelvin Rundle, our super team manager thought an important part of the winning process was to live like a rockstar for a day. The crazy man put us up in The Hilton just kilometres from the race venue. I don’t think I’ve ever even seen the OUTSIDE of The Hilton. It’s not often women cyclists are so well looked after and it’s an absolute privilege that we certainly took full advantage of! We wined and dined and slept in our cloud-like beds feeling relaxed and happy about the race ahead.

"Apparently someone was going to buy me a movie ticket but I was not to go."

We were met at the event by a really big enthusiastic crowd who were settled in watching the graded riders race around the St Kilda circuit before us. Our Seight.com.au tent was set up and ready for us to run through our final race prep which included some direct instructions from Kimberley of which not one of us could decipher at the time (or even now for that matter). Apparently someone was going to buy me a movie ticket but I was not to go. The U.S racing scene has done some damage to our Aussie sprinter!

[embed]http://instagram.com/p/wkynRALp3m/?modal=true[/embed]

Standing on the start line, I took a gel from my pocket, tore one corner off and squeezed, completely missing my mouth and successfully losing an entire gel to the front of my jersey. I promptly reversed back to our Seight tent and asked our team helper Tegan to clean me up. I don’t think she even asked what happened, it’s generally expected from me I think but I was back on the start line within moments and ready to roll. Never happened!

The race was an hour of fun. The Roxsolt Ladies communicated really well and we were able to represent in every break.

We won 3 of 5 sprint primes and Chloe won the sprint points classification. Jo did a fabulous job of covering one million moves while Lauren and I looked after our sprinters.

Coming into the final few laps Lauren and I controlled the front. Through the final bend of the day, Chloe took to the front and drove it. I was second wheel and heard Kimberly come behind and tell me she was there - and I knew we were set.

As Chloe flew around the last left hander, I dropped her wheel and yelled “go for it Chloeeeeeee!” And she did. My move acted as a bit of a no-mans-land buffer for Kimberley who timed her jump well. She did enough to hold off Eileen (2nd place from Wiggle) but not too much to bring other riders ahead of Chloe who held on for 3rd. Fantastic!!

[embed]https://twitter.com/PelotonCafe/status/544031025098006529[/embed]

We celebrated with lots of thanks to our main man Kelvin Rundle. He’s really on to a good thing with this team and although today was my final hit out in the Roxsolt jersey because my UCI team contract begins January 1st, I will always fly the Roxsolt flag and be proud for being a part of something so great.

Hashtag Roxsolt Ladies.

[embed]https://twitter.com/Kimbers_Wells/status/544019111747928066[/embed]

[embed]https://twitter.com/chloe_hosking/status/544038124846723072[/embed]

[embed]https://twitter.com/LaurenKitchen1/status/544024524996345856[/embed]

Guest Blog: Joanne Hogan's take on the 2014 Tour of Bright

While the Roxsolt squad battled it out in Launceston at the Stan Siejka Cycling Classic in early December the Sydney Uni Velo squad took to the roads of Bright, Victoria to conquer some pretty gruelling mountains. For the past few years Sydney Uni Velo and Roxsolt have had a close relationship; Roxsolt has been a major sponsor of women's cycling programs, fostering development and encouraging growth at the Sydney Uni Velo Cycling Club. 

The Bright weekend was no different. Taking the formula that has worked so well for the Roxsolt racing team Sydney Uni Velo recruited some strong, experienced riders to help mentor and teach up and coming Sydney Uni Velo riders. In this blog post Jo Hogan tells you about the race.


 

The town of Bright, Victoria, is one of my favourite places in the world. Surrounded by green foliage and mountains, it has a mystic, serene, tranquil feel as soon as you enter the town boundaries. I always feel a sense of inner calm approaching the town sign as it looms in the distance on the drive in from Melbourne.

Bright also holds one of my favourite bike races of the year: the Tour of Bright.  A three-stage tour taking in a time trial and two hilly road stages, this race also marks the start of my build up for the Australian Road Cycling National Championships in January.

For the event I was racing with Sydney Uni Velo Cycling Team, under the guidance of director sportif and team manager of my summer team (Roxsolt), Kelvin Rundle.

The team included my former Bigla Cycling teammate Taryn Heather, as well as Carlee Taylor, Holly Hawtin, and Marrisa Madden. On paper, we had some of the strongest climbers in the race; however, as we were all in different phases of our training for the build up to the 2015 season, we were a little unsure how we would fair. Personally I hadn’t tapered for the event, but I always have high expectations of myself, having also won the event in the past.

They agreed with my proposal: go from the gun! We would send one rider after the other and try and force a break. The race was shortened come race day so this played further into our favour.

The stage 1 time trial was late on Friday afternoon and claps of thunder and heavy rain fell right before my official start. I was lucky enough to get a dry run for my race and threw everything I could at the stage, getting as aero as I could possibly manage on my road bike. Time trials never tickle and I walked away happy that I gave it all I had on the day. Taryn was our best-placed finisher in sixth position overall.

The first road stage started early the following day; the “Rose White Gap Loop” finished atop Tawonga Gap.

Unfortunately, the race was extremely uneventful until the final, decisive 8km finish climb.

Our “little big team” tried to force a break early in the first part of the race, however, it was shut down numerous times. I took the first queen of the mountain (QOM) sprint over Rose White Gap, but the fireworks didn’t really start until 4km to go to, when Miranda Griffith put in a strong attack. I was positioned at the front when the move occurred, but I was unable to follow with my legs feeling like concrete blocks beneath me. I kept pushing the power down on the pedals as best I could, and found myself with a few riders to battle to the finish line.

Feeling a bit flat after not being able to perform as well as I would have hoped, I took myself down to the Bright River for some cold water recovery and to contemplate the game plan for the final stage up Mount Hotham the following day. Hard, aggressive racing suits me, so I formulated a plan to run past the team and Kelvin.

They agreed with my proposal: go from the gun! We would send one rider after the other and try and force a break. The race was shortened come race day so this played further into our favour.

Unfortunately, we didn’t manage to execute the plan the way we had hoped. We attacked and attacked, but were chased down time and time again. It was worth a shot and it definitely made my day more challenging.

One of my good friends and personal trainer often talks about the mental challenges of pushing yourself to the edge, then going beyond what your body would normally allow you do when it hurts.  Finding that little something extra when you think you don’t having anything left is the challenge.

Come the start of the final 20km climb up to Hotham, my legs were feeling a bit juicy. The road rose up and I had to dig pretty deep to hold the initial pace, but I managed to recover and position myself back in the front group.

The infamous Meg, a sharp little pitch 5km into Hotham inflicted a sting in the legs once again, as Miranda powered up to win the QOM; I gave chase to take third. The front group then settled and reformed, with the pace was being set by Verita Stewart and Kate Perry.

As the kilometres ticked down toward the final 2km ramp, I went through moments of doubt and pain, but kept focused on the wheel in front of me with each pedal stroke I pushed. I knew my early attacks had taken a bit of energy out of the tank, but I wanted to walk away happy that I did everything I could to get the best result. Carlee was in the front group with me and as the finish approached, I told her that I would lead her into the climb. Miranda attacked and Carlee missed my wheel. But I didn’t have the legs to give chase — or did I?

On reflection, there were moments throughout the race where I think I can improve. This is especially true as I head into my summer of racing and the main event, the national championship.  One of my good friends and personal trainer often talks about the mental challenges of pushing yourself to the edge, then going beyond what your body would normally allow you do when it hurts.  Finding that little something extra when you think you don’t having anything left is the challenge. That is what it all comes down to, in a way.

From the weekend, Sydney Uni Velo took the overall team classification prize; I learned more about where my form is in preparation for the summer of racing — and what I need to work on to find that extra something that is going to see me on the podium on the 10th of January.

Hosking and Roxsolt Racing Team Looking to Defend Shimano Super Criterium Title

Continuing their summer racing program the Sydney based Roxsolt Racing team will lineup on Sunday in downtown Melbourne for one of the toughest, richest and most iconic bike races in Australia, the Shimano Super Criterium.  Last year’s Shimano Super Criterium winner Chloe Hosking will join forces with Stan Siejka Launceston Cycling Classic winner Kimberley Wells and Australia National Criterium Champion Sarah Roy in this weekend’s event.

“It’s really great to have such a strong and supportive team to race for over the summer. I’m really looking forward to getting down to St Kilda and racing," -  Chloe Hosking

2011 National Criterium Champion Lauren Kitchen, European professional Joanne Hogan and Dutch development rider Karen Elzing complete the six rider strong squad.

Hosking said she’s excited to get back to racing with her Roxsolt Racing team and to be back at he Super Criterium.

“It’s really great to have such a strong and supportive team to race for over the summer. I’m really looking forward to getting down to St Kilda and racing,

“It had a such a great vibe last year and was just a cool place to race. That atmosphere is what makes the Aussie summer racing so special and the super crit nailed it last year,” Chloe said.

“Kelvin Rundle and Lauren Kitchen have done a great job this year of recruiting some really strong riders and I think we showed last weekend in Launceston that we all come together really well and make the most of the opportunities in front of us,” she said.

At last weekend’s Launceston Cycling Festival the Roxsolt team won both the Symmons Plains Raceway Kermesse and the Stan Siejka Launceston Cycling Classic.

The winning team.

“With such a strong team we’ve got a few options we can play with on Sunday,” Chloe continued.

“It’s so great to see sponsors supporting women’s cycling to this extend, it’s actually really exciting to be a part of,” she said.

The Men's & Women's Elite Races prize pool consists of place getters, a sprint points competition, fastest lap rider and sprint primes.

“The team is about seizing opportunities missed by others," - Kelvin Rundle

The event will feature commentary by the voice of cycling Matt Keenan as well as cycling legend Scott McGrory.

Established late last year the Roxsolt racing team is managed by Kelvin Rundle and aims at providing a well organised and supportive environment for top Australian female cyclists during the Australian summer while also placing an emphasis on supporting the development of up and coming domestic and international talent.

“The team is about seizing opportunities missed by others. Many of our riders race for European teams but have little support when they come back to Australia. We give them the support they need to race throughout the Australian summer,” Kelvin said.

“It’s an idea inline with the business values of Roxsolt. We think the formula is working pretty well,” he said.

Guest Blog: Chloe Hosking's take on the Launceston Cycling Festival

If you ever speak to Kelvin Rundle (the managing director of Roxsolt) about the Roxsolt cycling team you’ll undoubtedly be told that I am to be blamed for the team’s inception. That’s partly true I suppose but it was definitely Kelvin’s infectious enthusiasm for women’s cycling and his unbelievable generosity that really made the team a reality. Back in 2013 I borrowed Kelvin’s Zipp 404s for the national road race in Ballarat. We got to talking about how great it would be to have more competitive women’s team at races like the Mitchelton Bay Cycling Classic and the National Criterium Championship, two races I had just competed in.

For me, this past weekend at the Launceston Cycling Classic really confirmed that what Kelvin and I set out to do has been achieved.

Since I was 17 I had managed to find myself guest rides in mixed teams throughout the Australian summer  but they just weren’t competitive against the likes of the Dream Team, managed by Rochelle Gilmore, or the Orica-AIS and Australian National Team squads that have dominated the racing over the past three or four years.

While being out number was at times frustrating the main issue was the struggle when I came home to Australia after racing the European season to get to a lot of the races around Australia, both financially and logistically.

Kelvin’s idea (with my help) was to create a well organised environment that could help riders in my position but also maintain a development aspect to help rising Australian domestic riders grow and develop. And that’s exactly what he did.

The team’s first race was the NSW GP in 2013 and we recruited the likes of Sarah Roy (current National Criterium Champion) and London Olympian Lucy Martin. Since then the team has just exploded. It has established itself as one of the best summer racing teams on the circuit and in my opinion is on par with the professional teams of Orica-AIS and Wiggle Honda.

IMG_0865

For me, this past weekend at the Launceston Cycling Classic really confirmed that what Kelvin and I set out to do has been achieved.

As was the aim of the team from the outset, the team’s lineup for the Launceston Cycling Classic was a mix of international riders with plenty of experience and one development rider who could have the opportunity to learn and race with ‘the big girls’.

Lauren Kitchen, the 2011 National Criterium lead the team, with 2013 Criterium Champion Kimberley Wells also on the roster. Just incase we didn’t have enough talent the current Criterium Champion Sarah Roy was also down to race. Throw in myself and development rider Steph Lord and we knew we had a pretty strong team.

Heading into Saturday’s Symmons Plains Raceway Kermesse our tactics were pretty open; be aggressive and if it came down to it set ‘Kimbers’ up for the sprint.

Four laps into the 15 lap race I turned around to see a light acceleration I’d put in had actually spilt the field. All of a sudden I was away with Eileen Roe (Wiggle Honda) and Loes Gunnewijk (Orica-AIS). I knew it was a good situation for myself and the team so I drove the break hard for the next few laps to really establish a gap.

With two laps to go we all started looking at each other, ‘no really, you can have the front, it’s fine’. At one point I thought we may revert to track standing. Coming into the final 300 metres I was positioned in third wheel. Loes opened up the sprint early and I sat comfortably on Eileen’s wheel. It was a strong headwind finish so I left my run late and probably only let her wheel go with about 75 metres left to race, but it was enough. I crossed the line first and managed a very, very poor victory salute. You trying taking both hands off the bars in a head-cross wind.

But the ‘big’ one was really the Stan Siejka Cycling Classic on Sunday being help in downtown Launceston. The race was going to be televised live on SBS and for us it was important not only to race well as a team but also to showcase how exciting women’s cycling can be.

Lauren actually won the event in 2013 so she was able to give us a lot of valuable advice about the course, possible scenarios and what we should do. In the end, we decided on a similar race plan to Saturday; be aggressive (be, be aggressive).

Alarm bells started to sound.

As it turned out we weren’t the only team with this plan because as soon as the gun went off there were riders flying up the road like missiles. I was speaking with Gracie Elvin of Orica-AIS later and she said he aim for the race was to be the first attack of the day, and she was.

It didn’t take long for a group of five to establish themselves which included our Kimberley Wells. Kimbers is probably one of, if not the, fastest sprinter going around at the moment so it was a good situation for us in that we knew if it came down to a sprint she probably had it covered. But we decided it would be nice to have one more Roxsolt lady up the road with her just incase.

Lauren, Steph, Sarah and I all started attacking, trying to sneak away from the peloton which was about 30seconds behind the lead group of five. I’ve heard people say when you don't care who gets away just as long as some does that 'we're going to roll the dice'. That's what we did.

After a few attacks Sarah snuck away with another Orica-AIS and Wiggle Honda rider and quickly closed the gap to the lead group, but she’d dug too deep. Next thing we knew Sarah was back in the peloton with us, unfortunately the other two riders weren’t. Alarm bells started to sound.

Kimbers was up the road with two Orica-AIS riders, three Wiggle Honda and one Tasmania rider. This was not an ideal situation. I heard our director yell from the side of the road ‘bring that back’ and I couldn’t agree more.

Steph, Lauren, Sarah and I started working hard to close the gap which had blown out to more than 40 seconds. In the end we got within about 10 seconds of the lead group but it didn’t matter. Kimbers road an incredibly smart race, after shutting down all the attacks in the closing two laps she also dominated the sprint for the race victory beating Gracie Elvin and Eileen Roe.

We won a giant novelty check and $150 worth of salmon which was probably the highlight of my weekend. That and all the Australians leaving it to the only non-english speaking person to ask for directions to lunch.

The winning team.

It was a great weekend for the Roxsolt racing team, but the reality is that probably every member of the team wouldn't have been able to travel to Tasmania if it weren't for Roxsolt. Now that I think about it, Kelvin lending me his wheels in 2013 is just a giant metaphor for what the Roxsolt team is all about; providing support to riders who might not have it otherwise.

Wells Wraps up Successful Launceston Campaign for Roxsolt

Sydney based team claims victory in both the Symmons Plains Raceway Kermesse and the Stan Seijka Cycling Classic in Launceston Cycling Festival. Kimberley Wells (29) sprinted to victory ahead of Gracie Elvin (Orica-AIS) and Eileen Roe (Wiggle Honda) in yesterday's Stan Seijka Launceston Cycling Classic.

Wells, who joined the Roxsolt team in November, out smarted her breakaway companions to take a convincing win in one of the countries most prestigious criteriums.

The Roxsolt team after the finish of Sunday's Stan Siejka Cycling Classic.

Wells escaped with four other riders in the opening stages of the forty-five minute criterium held in downtown Launceston before two more riders bridged across to the lead group. The group of seven included two Orica-AIS riders and three Wiggle Honda riders.

In the closing laps Wells, despite being outnumbered, responded to strong attacks from her rivals and remained in the hunt for race honours.

Rounding the final bend in second position Wells timed her sprint perfectly, crossing the line with plenty of time to celebrate.

"I was trying to be really observant in the final laps incase anyone tried to go for a flyer or go early. I wanted it to come down to a sprint but given how aggressive the race had been I had to be careful because the attacks had stung my legs a bit, so I wanted to leave it late," Wells said.

"It was great for women's cycling that the race was televised. It was a really hard and really aggressive race, I think it was a great showcase for women's cycling," she said.

The 2013 national criterium champion, Wells, had a difficult year in 2014. Putting her medical career on hold she inked a professional contract with a French team after a string of impressive results in Australia and the United States in 2013. However, a muscle tear near a sciatic nerve in her piriformis saw her return to Australia in April and unable to exercise for four months.

"It's been such a hard last 12 months, both physically and mentally. To be back doing what I love and doing well feels fantastic. I wouldn't be doing this without the support of Roxsolt or my state academy ACTAS," Wells said.

The winning team.

Wells' teammate Chloe Hosking claimed victory in the Symmons Plains Raceway Kermesse on Saturday edging out Eileen Roe (Wiggle Honda) and Loes Gunnewijk (Orica-AIS) after the trio escaped in the opening laps of the 15 lap race.

Hosking said it is exciting to see the Roxsolt team competing with the likes of European professional teams Orica-AIS and Wiggle Honda.

"Roxsolt was sort of born out of the idea of wanting to create another top, competitive team on the Aussie summer racing scene," Hosking said.

"For a few years now the scene has really been dominated by one or two teams and for riders like myself who come back from Europe after racing the season with our trade teams it can be hard to get to races, and do well at races, if you don't have any support," she said.

"I met with Kelvin Rundle (Roxsolt managing director) in 2013 and this idea about creating a professional, organised environment for women who didn't have support just blossomed,

"The fit with Roxsolt and women's cycling is not necessarily a clear one but it's obviously a relationship that's working. Roxsolt as a consultancy firm is about seizing opportunities missed by others and I think that's really what Roxsolt as a cycling team is about,

"We create a team of riders who otherwise might not be able to race at all," Hosking said.

Chloe in the lead group at the Symmons Plains Raceway Kermesse.

Current and Former National Criterium Champions Headline Roxsolt Team for Launceston Cycling Festival

The Sydney based team boast three of the last four national criterium champions including current National Champion Sarah Roy.  Roxsolt Racing Team will be lining up for the Symmons Plains Raceway Kermesse this Saturday, 6th of November, at the Launceston Cycling Festival.

Australian National Criterium Champion Sarah Roy leads the Roxsolt team with the 2013 criterium champion Kimberley Wells and 2011 champion Lauren Kitchen also featuring in the five rider strong Roxsolt team.

Australian Olympic, Commonwealth and World Championship representative Chloe Hosking and development rider Stephanie Lord complete the team which will also compete in the Stan Siejka Launceston Cycling Classic on Sunday.

Last year’s Stan Siejka Launceston Cycling Classic winner Lauren Kitchen is excited to be back in Tasmania with the strong Roxsolt squad.

“I think our team will be the strongest there and we will have a point to prove against the higher profile teams of Wiggle Honda and Orica-AIS,” Lauren said.

“I’m really excited to have the opportunity to defend my win from last year in Tassie. Roxsolt gives me the opportunity to balance my base training with some good intensity to get the season off to a good start,” she said.

IMG_0865

The 2014/15 summer racing series is the second season Roxsolt has sponsored a women’s team.

Director Sportif and Roxsolt founder Kelvin Rundle said the decision to sponsor a women’s team for the second year in a row was about providing women with a professional and well organised environment to race in over the summer.

“We want to see the best women in the world racing in Australia,” Mr Rundle said.

“Roxsolt is a Management Consulting business that discovers opportunities missed by others. The team is run for the riders to give them the best environment to race in and to show Australia that they are competitive against the biggest teams in the world,” he said.

The race will be broadcast live on SBS from 15.30, Sunday 7, December.

Throughout the summer the team will also line up for the Melbourne SuperCrit (December 15), Sydney Uni Velo Open Criterium (December 21), the Mitchelton Bay Cycling Classic and the Tour Down Under Criterium Series.

Roxsolt Launch Second Summer Racing Season at Noosa Crit 

The Sydney based team boast National Criterium Champion and World, Commonwealth and Olympic representatives on their rooster for the 2014/15 summer racing season.

Roxsolt Racing Team will be lining up for its first race of the Australian summer this Saturday, 1st of November, at the Subaru Noosa Open Criterium, in Noosa, Queensland.

Australian National Criterium Champion Sarah Roy leads the Roxsolt team at the Noosa Open Criterium. Karen Elzing, a criterium specialist from the Netherlands has come out especially for the summer series and will also take the start line in the Roxsolt colours on Saturday.

The 2014/15 summer racing series is the second season Roxsolt has sponsored a women’s team.

Director Sportif and Roxsolt founder Kelvin Rundle said the decision to sponsor a women’s team for the second year in a row was an easy decision.

“We want to see the best women in the world racing in Australia,” Mr Rundle said.

“Roxsolt is a Management Consulting business that discovers opportunities missed by others. The team is run for the riders to give them the best environment to race in and to show Australia that they are competitive against the biggest teams in the world,” he said. \

“We are again partnering with Sydney University Sports and Fitness (SUSF) over summer,” Mr Rundle continued.

The team, then known as Roxsolt Sydney Uni Velo Team, made a splash in their first season on the circuit last year with Chloe Hosking winning a stage of the Mitchelton Bay Cycle Classic and Sarah Roy winning the Australian National Criterium Championship.

“SUSF is a great supporter of women's cycling through their Elite Athlete Program, where students can study at Sydney Uni and receive a cycling scholarship. NSW investment in women's cycling is a late starter. To have Sydney Uni backing the sport through funding athletes is fantastic,” Mr Rundle said.

Throughout the summer the team will line up for the Melbourne Kermesse (November 1), Launceston Kermesse (November 16) and Criterium (December 6-7), the Melbourne SuperCrit (December 15), Sydney Uni Velo Open Criterium (December 21), the Mitchelton Bay Cycling Classic and the Tour Down Under Criterium Series.

Roxsolt’s sister company, Roxcycl, an Australian cycle clothing and distribution company will launch it’s 2015 #mygoalrox Ambassador Program on Friday, 31st of October, at the Noosa Multisport festival. 

Regardless of skill level or cycling experience any woman over the age of 18 in NSW or the ACT can apply for the Roxcycl Ambassador Program if they have a goal they need help achieving.

Successful applicants will receive up to $1000 towards their goal’s expenses and a selection of Vanderkitten and Velocio kit to champion while working towards their big new goal.

“As big fans of women's cycling the Ambassador Program seemed like a good way to help provide funding to the sport that we are passionate about while helping riders get their hands on awesome kit,” managing director of Roxcycl, Tegan Cox, said.

Women's Cycling Survey

At Roxsolt we recognise that for females the idea of turning up and trying something new can be daunting. To assist in making the decision around trying a new club, bunch ride or race we have put together the Women's Cycling Survey. This is an opportunity for women to rate cycling activities from 1 to 5 based on a broad range of criteria. The survey can be submitted here. Data is published monthly and the current data publication date is the 28th June 2014. You can find the results below based on the feedback of other women.


 ACT


 Canberra


Races

Junior & Women's Tour of Canberra - Women's Elite and Div2 (Single Race) -  www.cyclingactevents.com

overall score - 4 out of 5
most suitable for - Perfect intro to racing, Female club racers A, B, or C grade, WMAS
ride vibe - a fair amount of ego but still a little friendly
targeted at - BAM! All out smashfest, all business, all of the time
reviewed by - I'm comfortable racing and riding in the bunch
Before joining the Activity did the website tell you everything you needed to know? - 4 out of 5 On arrival, did things go well and did you feel welcome? - 4 out of 5
Were the facilities provided adequate? - 5 out of 5
Did you feel safe? - 5 out of 5
Did you feel valued? - 4 out of 5
Would you recommend the Activity to other female cyclists? - 5 out of 5
Was the Activity well run? - 4 out of 5
How many other female cyclists took part? - 5 out of 5 (everyone was female)

VCC Summer Supercrits- Men's Grades Only -  forum.vikingscycling.org.au

overall score - 4 out of 5
most suitable for - Perfect intro to racing, Female club racers A, B, or C grade, Elite Women
ride vibe - pretty friendly and outgoing
targeted at - a bit of smashfest
reviewed by - I'm comfortable racing and riding in the bunch
Before joining the Activity did the website tell you everything you needed to know? - 4 out of 5 On arrival, did things go well and did you feel welcome? - 4 out of 5
Were the facilities provided adequate? - 3 out of 5
Did you feel safe? - 5 out of 5
Did you feel valued? - 5 out of 5
Would you recommend the Activity to other female cyclists? - 5 out of 5
Was the Activity well run? - 4 out of 5
How many other female cyclists took part? - 3 out of 5 (a fair number)

Canberra Cycling Club Crits- Multiple Women's Grades (Separate Race for each Grade) - www.canberracyclingclub.org.au

overall score - 3 out of 5
most suitable for - Perfect intro to racing, Female club racers A, B, or C grade, Elite Women
ride vibe - nearly all ego
targeted at - a bit of smashfest
reviewed by - I'm comfortable racing and riding in the bunch
Before joining the Activity did the website tell you everything you needed to know? - 4 out of 5 On arrival, did things go well and did you feel welcome? - 3 out of 5
Were the facilities provided adequate? - 4 out of 5
Did you feel safe? - 3 out of 5
Did you feel valued? - 2 out of 5
Would you recommend the Activity to other female cyclists? - 3 out of 5
Was the Activity well run? - 5 out of 5
How many other female cyclists took part? - 2 out of 5 (a few)

NSW


Sydney


Bunches

Sydney Uni Velo - www.suvelo.com.au

overall score - 4 out of 5
most suitable for - something for everyone
ride vibe - pretty friendly and outgoing
targeted at - middle pace, something for everyone
reviewed by - I'm comfortable racing and riding in the bunch
Before joining the Activity did the website tell you everything you needed to know? - 3 out of 5 On arrival, did things go well and did you feel welcome? - 4 out of 5
Were the facilities provided adequate? - 4 out of 5
Did you feel safe? - 4 out of 5
Did you feel valued? - 4 out of 5
Would you recommend the Activity to other female cyclists? - 4 out of 5
Was the Activity well run? - 4 out of 5
How many other female cyclists took part? - 2 out of 5 (a few)

Rapha Women's Ride (Friday's)

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Rapha Ride

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LIV Women's Ride

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Cycling Clubs

Sydney Uni Velo - www.suvelo.com.au

overall score - 4 out of 5
most suitable for - something for everyone
ride vibe - pretty friendly and outgoing
targeted at - middle pace, something for everyone
reviewed by - I'm comfortable racing and riding in the bunch
Before joining the Activity did the website tell you everything you needed to know? - 3 out of 5 On arrival, did things go well and did you feel welcome? - 4 out of 5
Were the facilities provided adequate? - 4 out of 5
Did you feel safe? - 4 out of 5
Did you feel valued? - 4 out of 5
Would you recommend the Activity to other female cyclists? - 4 out of 5
Was the Activity well run? - 4 out of 5
How many other female cyclists took part? - 2 out of 5 (a few)

LACC - www.lacc.org.au

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MWCC - www.manlywarringahcc.org.au

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Races

Sydney Uni Velo Club Race - Women's Elite and Div2 (Single Race) - www.suvelo.com.au

overall score - 3 out of 5 most suitable for - Female club racers A, B, or C grade
ride vibe - pretty friendly and outgoing
targeted at - middle pace, something for everyone
reviewed by - I'm comfortable racing and riding in the bunch
Before joining the Activity did the website tell you everything you needed to know? - 3 out of 5 On arrival, did things go well and did you feel welcome? - 4 out of 5 Were the facilities provided adequate? - 4 out of 5 Did you feel safe? - 4 out of 5 Did you feel valued? - 3 out of 5 Would you recommend the Activity to other female cyclists? - 3 out of 5 Was the Activity well run? - 4 out of 5 How many other female cyclists took part? - 2 out of 5 (a few)

Sydney Road Titles

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Wagga Wagga Classic

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MWCC West Head Road Race

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NSW Clubs TTT Championships

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NSW Elite Criterium Championships

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Sarah Roy (2014 Australian Criterium Champion)

When Roxsolt was introduced to emerging Australian rider, Sarah Roy it was pretty obvious she had a big win waiting to come forward. So after riding for Chloe Hosking over summer and coming so close to victory in Stage 4 of the Bay Classic it was not a big surprise (but still very exciting) to watch Roy win the 2014 Australian Criterium Championships. We can't wait to see what Sarah can do during the rest of 2014, as she has her first full European based season.

Sydney Uni Velo

Roxsolt staff are active members of Sydney Uni Velo both from a racing perspective but are also involved in the management committee and with the women's race team. Roxsolt has provided in kind support through management and logistics assistance for the women's race team, and in kind sponsorship to promote Sydney Uni Velo as part of the Roxsolt summer criterium team.